Orford Fishing

The Prosser River, which runs through the town, has sea-run trout and some resident trout upstream. Flathead, mullet, Australian salmon and mackerel can be caught from the banks of the river and there are a few jetties that are great for kids. Spinners and lures give good results, or if you prefer bait, fish, pilchards, prawns, sandworms or even red meat or chicken will do the trick.
Fishing from the sheltered beach on either side of Orford will produce salmon, flathead and whiting. From the boat, drifting will nearly always produce flathead (some big “kings” at certain times) and morwong are quite common.
Both Orford and Triabunna provide access to Maria Island. Tasmania’s largest marine reserve is located on the western side of the Island and extends one kilometre offshore from Cape Boullanger to the Return point. No fishing is allowed in the reserve.
The eastern side of Maria (accessible by boat) is well known for the full range of game fishing, particularly tuna (southern bluefin, yellowfin and albacore). Reef fish including striped trumpeter are taken in selected areas. Charter boats are available which will increase your fishing results. Take care if boating in Mercury Passage and particularly the offshore waters of Maria Island as conditions change quickly.

Contact Details

Esplanade
Orford, 7190



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The Tasmanian tourism industry acknowledges the Tasmanian Aboriginal people and their enduring custodianship of lutruwita / Tasmania. We honour 40,000 years of uninterrupted care, protection and belonging to these islands, before the invasion and colonisation of European settlement. As a tourism industry that welcomes visitors to these lands, we acknowledge our responsibility to represent to our visitors Tasmania's deep and complex history, fully, respectfully and truthfully. We acknowledge the Aboriginal people who continue to care for this country today. We pay our respects to their elders, past and present. We honour their stories, songs, art, and culture, and their aspirations for the future of their people and these lands. We respectfully ask that tourism be a part of that future.